My professor asked us to design a logo for a typeface and then a postcard to advertise the typeface, using the logotype. I chose Akzidenz-Grotesk because I was drawn to its timeless and interesting look as well as its deep history. It was the first widely used sans serif, developed at the Berthold Typeshop in Berlin in 1896. It was part of the “Grotesk” group of typefaces because these first sans serifs were considered to be very ugly, or even grotesque. It was commonly used for posters, signage, and tickets.

postcard for a typeface

Akzidenz-Grotesk

Adobe Illustrator

 My professor asked us to design a logo for a typeface and then a postcard to advertise the typeface, using the logotype. I chose Akzidenz-Grotesk because I was drawn to its timeless and interesting look as well as its deep history. It was the first widely used sans serif, developed at the Berthold Typeshop in Berlin in 1896. It was part of the “Grotesk” group of typefaces because these first sans serifs were considered to be very ugly, or even grotesque. It was commonly used for posters, signage, and tickets.

My professor asked us to design a logo for a typeface and then a postcard to advertise the typeface, using the logotype. I chose Akzidenz-Grotesk because I was drawn to its timeless and interesting look as well as its deep history. It was the first widely used sans serif, developed at the Berthold Typeshop in Berlin in 1896. It was part of the “Grotesk” group of typefaces because these first sans serifs were considered to be very ugly, or even grotesque. It was commonly used for posters, signage, and tickets.

 These are my initial sketches for designing my logo for the postcard. Given the typeface was originally used for posters and signage I experimented with these concepts. I also experimented with the forms and counterforms to highlight the “G” of the typeface. This “G”was new in its time, and I also felt like it looked like an arrow. An arrow is symbolic of moving forward in time, which is appropriate for the first widley used sans serif. This was a step forward from a time that most valued serif fonts.

These are my initial sketches for designing my logo for the postcard. Given the typeface was originally used for posters and signage I experimented with these concepts. I also experimented with the forms and counterforms to highlight the “G” of the typeface. This “G”was new in its time, and I also felt like it looked like an arrow. An arrow is symbolic of moving forward in time, which is appropriate for the first widley used sans serif. This was a step forward from a time that most valued serif fonts.

 These are some of my initial designs for my logo.

These are some of my initial designs for my logo.

 This was the final logo I decided on. I tried to make it look like a billboard of sorts, to hark back to its use in signage. I also tilted the “G” to elaborate on the arrow concept. I wanted to include the name of the typeface as well as its initials to balance out the form.

This was the final logo I decided on. I tried to make it look like a billboard of sorts, to hark back to its use in signage. I also tilted the “G” to elaborate on the arrow concept. I wanted to include the name of the typeface as well as its initials to balance out the form.

 I found this original poster from the Berthold Typeshop and was attracted to its ornamentation. I interpreted this assignment as honoring the typeface in its history while also putting a more modern spin on the design so as to relate to people’s taste in the present day. printed it out and cropped the image at various locations and angles in the composition. I ultimately used the bottom right hand corner at an angle and exaggerated some of the elements of the decoration to fit this new cropping. The slant seemed appropriate to me because it felt more modern and of the present day, while still honoring its deep history and roots in the late 1900s.

I found this original poster from the Berthold Typeshop and was attracted to its ornamentation. I interpreted this assignment as honoring the typeface in its history while also putting a more modern spin on the design so as to relate to people’s taste in the present day. printed it out and cropped the image at various locations and angles in the composition. I ultimately used the bottom right hand corner at an angle and exaggerated some of the elements of the decoration to fit this new cropping. The slant seemed appropriate to me because it felt more modern and of the present day, while still honoring its deep history and roots in the late 1900s.

 This is the front of the postcard. I included some crucial information, but did not want to include so much that the user would not feel like they needed to turn it over to discover more about the typeface.

This is the front of the postcard. I included some crucial information, but did not want to include so much that the user would not feel like they needed to turn it over to discover more about the typeface.

 This is the back of the postcard. I left the righthand side blank for a theoretical address and postage. I kept the same angles from the front of the postcard and the same decoration to unite the front and back. The color palette is inspired by the german flag colors, to pay tribute to its original home of Berlin.

This is the back of the postcard. I left the righthand side blank for a theoretical address and postage. I kept the same angles from the front of the postcard and the same decoration to unite the front and back. The color palette is inspired by the german flag colors, to pay tribute to its original home of Berlin.